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ACRATH: "Action"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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ACRATH: "Recognition"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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ACRATH: "Information"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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ACRATH: "What is Human Trafficking?"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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Queensland Museum

The Queensland Museum is a museum of natural history, science, human achievement and local interest that was founded by the Queensland Philosophical Society in 1862. Over the last century it has been housed in various sites, namely former colonial administrative buildings, until the local government had a purpose built site constructed for the museum on Brisbane's South Bank in 1986. Funded by the Queensland Government, the Queensland Museum Trust operates a number of sites in addition to the Queensland Museum. These include the Science Centre, the Queensland Museum of Tropics and the Workshops Rail Museum.

The museum's aim is to connect its visitors to Queensland the place, the people and the region's position in the world through artefacts, interactives and events. There are over one million items in its collections. The permanent exhibitions look at Queensland's ecological and social development.

In 'Histories of Queensland,' the exhibition explores the theme of migration to the area. As well as examining the European migration to the area during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the displays discuss the role of indentured labourers from the South Sea Islands. These people were forcibly transported from their homes to work in Queensland's sugar industry. The display informs visitors about the hardships faced by these individuals and the negative legacies this brutal enslavement inflicted on the South Sea Islands from the nineteenth century until today.

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Czar

Australia is a destination country for women from Southeast Asia, South Korea, Taiwan, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and reportedly Eastern Europe trafficked for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation. Some men and women from several Pacific islands, India, the PRC, South Korea, the Philippines, and Ireland are fraudulently recruited to work temporarily in Australia, but subsequently are subjected to conditions of forced labour, including confiscation of travel documents, confinement, and threats of serious harm. Some indigenous teenage girls are subjected to forced prostitution at rural truck stops. Czar flew to Sydney from the Philippines on the promise of a successful boxing career. However, upon arrival Czar was forced to hand over his passport and was told he would be working as a cleaner in the mornings and evenings. Czar's work as a cleaner went unpaid and when he did box, his earnings were deducted for visa and travel expenses. Eventually Czar and the other boxers being exploited went to the police who helped them escape.

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Natalie

Criminal justice and victim support statistics, including the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) statistics noted below, confirm that forced prostitution and the commercial sexual exploitation of women and girls continues to be a reality in the Asian region. Rising internet usage rates, the availability of mobile phones, and poverty in many parts of Asia has facilitated online forms of child sexual abuse for profit. Natalie was born in South East Asia, where she was sexually exploited in an illegal brothel. She moved to Australia to work in a legal brothel, but found herself with a large debt for her recruitment, and was being charged for her expenses and as punishment. An NGO named Project Respect helped her to leave the sex industry by helping her to find alternative work.