Open Menu

Items

Sort:
  • Theme contains "Debt bondage"
Babu Shah.png

Babu Shah

Entire families migrate every year from other states in India to find work in Punjab’s brick kilns. The survey data suggest that there are more than 18 million people or 1.4 percent of the total population, who are living in conditions of modern slavery in India. Industries implicated in survey data include domestic work, the construction and sex industries, agriculture, fishing, manufacturing, manual labour, and forced begging. Most of India’s slavery problem is internal, and those from the most disadvantaged social strata—lowest caste Dalits, members of tribal communities, religious minorities, and women and girls from excluded groups—are most vulnerable.

Mangadeen.png

Mangadeen

Entire families migrate every year from other states in India to find work in Punjab’s brick kilns. The survey data suggest that there are more than 18 million people or 1.4 percent of the total population, who are living in conditions of modern slavery in India. Industries implicated in survey data include domestic work, the construction and sex industries, agriculture, fishing, manufacturing, manual labour, and forced begging. Most of India’s slavery problem is internal, and those from the most disadvantaged social strata—lowest caste Dalits, members of tribal communities, religious minorities, and women and girls from excluded groups—are most vulnerable.

Yashodha.png

Yashodha

Entire families migrate every year from other states in India to find work in Punjab’s brick kilns. The survey data suggest that there are more than 18 million people or 1.4 percent of the total population, who are living in conditions of modern slavery in India. Industries implicated in survey data include domestic work, the construction and sex industries, agriculture, fishing, manufacturing, manual labour, and forced begging. Most of India’s slavery problem is internal, and those from the most disadvantaged social strata—lowest caste Dalits, members of tribal communities, religious minorities, and women and girls from excluded groups—are most vulnerable.

Samjhana.jpg

Samjhana

There are an estimated 171,000 people living in modern slavery in Nepal. Within Nepal, bonded labour exists in agriculture, brick kilns, the stone-breaking industry, and domestic work. Sex trafficking of Nepali women and girls increasingly takes place in private apartments, rented rooms, guest houses, and restaurants. Nepali and Indian children are subjected to forced labor in the country, especially in domestic work, brick kilns, and the embroidered textile, or zari, industry. Under false promises of education and work opportunities, Nepali parents give their children to brokers who instead take them to frequently unregistered children’s homes in urban locations, where they are forced to pretend to be orphans to garner donations from tourists and volunteers; some of the children are also forced to beg on the street.

narrative image.png

Salima

There are an estimated 24,000 people living in modern slavery in Kyrgyzstan and 509,000 in Turkey (GSI 2018). Kyrgyzstan remains a source, transit and destination country for men, women and children subjected to forced labour and sex trafficking. Women from across the former Soviet Republic often travel to neighbouring countries with the promise of jobs as nannies, domestic workers, work in hotels and in the catering and entertainment sectors. However, upon arrival they find themselves sold to a pimp and forced in to sex work to pay off debt incurred for transportation, accommodation and the opportunity. Salima* was trafficked from Kyrgyzstan to Turkey to work as a sex worker.

narrative image.png

Laurence

There are an estimated 136,000 people living on conditions of modern slavery in the United Kingdom (Global Slavery Index 2018). According to the 2017 annual figures provided by the National Crime Agency, 5, 145 potential victims of modern slavery were referred through the National Referral Mechanism in 2017, of whom 2,454 were female, 2688 were male and 3 were transgender, with 41% of all referrals being children at the time of exploitation. People are subjected to slavery in the UK in the form of domestic servitude, labour exploitation, organ harvesting and sexual exploitation, with the largest number of potential victims originating from Albania, China, Vietnam and Nigeria. This data however does not consider the unknown numbers of victims that are not reported.

Daljit.jpg

Daljit Kaur

The Global Slavery Index 2018 estimates that on any given day there were nearly 8 million people living in modern slavery in India. While the bonded labour system is formally abolished and criminalised, recent research indicated that bonded labour is still prevalent in India. A 2016 report found that in the state of Tamil Nadu, 351 of 743 spinning mills used bonded labour schemes, otherwise known as Sumangali schemes. Similarly in granite quarries, wage advances and loans with an interest ranging from 24% to 36% are used to bond workers. Situations of debt bondage are often aggravated by the need to raise emergency funds or take on loans for health crises.

lakhwinder.jpg

Lakhwinder

The Global Slavery Index 2018 estimates that on any given day there were nearly 8 million people living in modern slavery in India. While the bonded labour system is formally abolished and criminalised, recent research indicated that bonded labour is still prevalent in India. A 2016 report found that in the state of Tamil Nadu, 351 of 743 spinning mills used bonded labour schemes, otherwise known as Sumangali schemes. Similarly in granite quarries, wage advances and loans with an interest ranging from 24% to 36% are used to bond workers. Situations of debt bondage are often aggravated by the need to raise emergency funds or take on loans for health crises.

Teaching Image.jpg

International Slavery Museum: "Curriculum Links"

The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and by December 2016 had welcomed more than 3.8 million visitors. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

Teaching Image.jpg

International Slavery Museum: "Case Studies"

The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and by December 2016 had welcomed more than 3.8 million visitors. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

Teaching Image.jpg

International Slavery Museum: "Worksheets"

The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and by December 2016 had welcomed more than 3.8 million visitors. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

Teaching Image.jpg

International Slavery Museum: "Lesson Plans"

The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and by December 2016 had welcomed more than 3.8 million visitors. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

Teaching Image.jpg

International Slavery Museum: "Contemporary Slavery"

The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and by December 2016 had welcomed more than 3.8 million visitors. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

Teaching Image.jpg

International Slavery Museum: "Key Concepts"

The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and by December 2016 had welcomed more than 3.8 million visitors. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

Teaching Image.jpg

Anti-Slavery International: "Slavery and What We Buy"

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

Teaching Image.jpg

Anti-Slavery International: "Child Slavery."

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

Teaching Image.jpg

Anti-Slavery International: "Fact Sheet, Modern Slavery in Britain"

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

Teaching Image.jpg

Anti-Slavery International: "Fact Sheet, Modern Slavery"

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

Teaching Image.jpg

Free the Slaves: "Case Studies and Discussion Questions."

Free the Slaves was born in the early days of the new millennium, dedicated to alerting the world about slavery’s global comeback and to catalyze a resurgence of the abolition movement.

Slavery has been outlawed everywhere, but it has not been eradicated. Free the Slaves exists to help finish the work that earlier generations of abolitionists started.

We help those in slavery escape the brutality of bondage. We help prevent others from becoming trapped by traffickers. We help officials bring slave holders to justice. We help survivors restore their dignity, rebuild their lives, and reclaim the future for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Slavery will end when businesses clean up their supply chains and consumers demand slavery-free products, when governments and international institutions toughen enforcement and fund anti-slavery work worldwide, and when activists and advocates educate the vulnerable about their rights and empower those in slavery to take a stand for freedom.

Teaching Image.jpg

Free the Slaves: "Activity Sheet"

Free the Slaves was born in the early days of the new millennium, dedicated to alerting the world about slavery’s global comeback and to catalyze a resurgence of the abolition movement.

Slavery has been outlawed everywhere, but it has not been eradicated. Free the Slaves exists to help finish the work that earlier generations of abolitionists started.

We help those in slavery escape the brutality of bondage. We help prevent others from becoming trapped by traffickers. We help officials bring slave holders to justice. We help survivors restore their dignity, rebuild their lives, and reclaim the future for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Slavery will end when businesses clean up their supply chains and consumers demand slavery-free products, when governments and international institutions toughen enforcement and fund anti-slavery work worldwide, and when activists and advocates educate the vulnerable about their rights and empower those in slavery to take a stand for freedom.