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2007 Aberdeenshire North East Story Screenshot.png

A North East Story: Scotland, Africa and Slavery in the Caribbean

This online exhibition and learning resource linking the history of transatlantic slavery to North East Scotland was organised by an Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire Bicentenary Committee, including representatives from Aberdeenshire Council, Aberdeen City Council, the University of Aberdeen, the Robert Gordon University and the African and African-Caribbean communities. It followed on from a service of commemoration and a series of public lectures sponsored by the Committee in 2007. The exhibition logo is inspired by the mythical Sankofa bird, a cultural symbol of the Akan-speaking peoples of Ghana in West Africa. Featured here are a number of resources available to download from the North East Story website.

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ACRATH: "Action"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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ACRATH: "Information"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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ACRATH: "Recognition"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

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ACRATH: "What is Human Trafficking?"

ACRATH stands for the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans. We are endorsed by Catholic Religious Australia – the peak body for 155 religious orders in Australia, representing over 5,700 religious sisters, brothers and priests.

ACRATH is committed to working together towards the elimination of human trafficking in Australia, the Asia Pacific region, and globally.

Am I Not a Man and a Brother Screenshot.png

Am I Not a Man and a Brother?

‘Am I Not a Man and a Brother?’, an online exhibition to mark the bicentenary, was launched by the Bodleian Library of African and Commonwealth Studies at Rhodes House. Some of the items were also on view in an exhibition at Rhodes House in April and May 2007. The exhibition included manuscripts and books from the Library, among them the manuscript journal of Rev. James Ramsay, who wrote and worked against slavery after seeing for himself the conditions on board a slave ship while a Royal Navy surgeon. Also exhibited were related artefacts from the collection of Franklin Smith, including a tobacco jar and a clay pipe bowl, both in the shape of the head of a slave (indicating that their owners may have been slave owners), and the late 18th-century engraving of a slave market in the West Indies, published by an anti-slave trade body.

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Anti-Slavery International: "Child Slavery."

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

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Anti-Slavery International: "Fact Sheet, Modern Slavery in Britain"

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

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Anti-Slavery International: "Fact Sheet, Modern Slavery"

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

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Anti-Slavery International: "Slavery and What We Buy"

Anti-Slavery International is the world’s oldest international human rights organisation, founded in 1839 by British abolitionists such as Thomas Clarkson.

Today, Anti-Slavery International is the only British charity exclusively working to eliminate all forms of slavery and slavery like practices throughout the world, including:

- forced labour - debt bondage - human trafficking - descent-based slavery - worst forms of child labour - slavery in supply chains - forced and early marriage - the exploitation of migrant workers in conditions amounting to slavery

We have consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council, participatory status with the Council of Europe and we are a member of the International Labour Organization Special List of NGOs.

2007 Sheffield Breaking Chains Equiano.jpg

Breaking Chains - Sheffield Civil Rights

Breaking Chains - Sheffield Civil Rights was a project by Sheffield Galleries and Museum Trust to look at the slave trade and to celebrate Sheffield’s heritage by exploring the role local campaigners played in securing workers' rights. The resources targeted Key Stage 2 pupils. There was a particular focus on the visit to Sheffield by the African abolitionist Olaudah Equiano in 1790. Actor Joe Williams played Equiano in a dramatisation still available to view on the teaching resource. Featured here are some of the downloads available.

KS3_Cotton_Threads.pdf

Cotton Threads

Bury Archives and Museum collaborated on an exhibition based on the journals, letters and other papers of John Hutchinson. The Hutchinson family's cotton spinning business had links to slavery in the United States: in 1848, John Hutchinson travelled to America to buy cotton produced by slaves. The exhibition at Bury Art Gallery featured archives, museum objects and paintings that put the papers into a social context. Cotton Threads went on tour to branch libraries, where talks and family workshops explored family histories and the cotton business. Volunteers assisted in conserving, cataloguing and digitising the Hutchinson papers, which were made available online. Primary school pupils took part in workshops held in the exhibition and a resource pack for secondary schools was produced with local teachers (available to download from the Cotton Threads website).

2007 Emancipation of the Dispossessed Deptford Guided Walk.pdf

Emancipation of the Dispossessed: Slavery, Abolition and Us - a South East London angle

Emancipation of the Dispossessed was a local community project exploring the local history of Deptford and the surrounding areas and the connections with the transatlantic slave trade. Community groups and students from Lewisham College worked with theatre educators to research and develop 'Blood Sugar', a promenade performance through the Queen's House, Greenwich. The play, written and directed by John Turner, tells the story of slavery and abolition from a local angle, and the script was built around first-hand and eyewitness accounts, campaign pamphlets and reports to parliament. The project also produced learning resources aimed at Key Stage 3 History and Citizenship.

A guided walk explored Deptford’s links to the history of the transatlantic slave trade, uncovering stories of some of the local people who played an important role in the beginnings of the slave trade or the campaign for its abolition. London was an important slave trading port before Bristol and Liverpool dominated the trade. The trade and British colonies were protected by the Royal Navy, whose ships were built and prepared for voyages at the Royal Dockyards at Deptford.

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Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI): "Demand and Supply."

The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI) was co-founded in June 2007 by Nettie Washington Douglass, her son, Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. and Robert J. Benz. FDFI is an Abolitionist organization that combines lessons from the legacies of Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington: Abolition Through Education.

The founders represent a remarkable living history. Ms. Douglass and Mr. Morris are direct descendants of Frederick Douglass, the man called “the father of the civil rights movement” and Booker T. Washington, the famed educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute. Through the union of Ms. Douglass’ mother, Nettie Hancock Washington (granddaughter of Booker T. Washington), and her father, Dr. Frederick Douglass III (great grandson of Frederick Douglass), the founders unite the bloodlines of two of the most important names in American history.

A few years back, the founders were confronted for the first time with solid facts about modern day slavery: millions are still enslaved in every country of the world, including the United States, in conditions as bad or worse than those suffered by their ancestors. They decided that this was not something from which they could walk away especially considering the platform granted to them by their lineage.

Based on their experience and the opinions of leading experts in the field, FDFI founders believe that education and awareness are the first step to ending Human Trafficking in our lifetimes. The organization has, therefore, made it their business to educate the public about this veiled crime with the starting point being young people.

“When we work with students,” says Ms. Douglass, “we can accomplish several things at once: provide an interesting narrative about an important period in our history that is often overlooked; inspire modern Abolitionists; provide timely information that may prevent young people themselves from becoming victims and help create better world citizens.”

FDFI brings the guidance of history to the fight against modern forms of slavery.

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Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI): "History, Human Rights and the Power of One."

The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI) was co-founded in June 2007 by Nettie Washington Douglass, her son, Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. and Robert J. Benz. FDFI is an Abolitionist organization that combines lessons from the legacies of Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington: Abolition Through Education.

The founders represent a remarkable living history. Ms. Douglass and Mr. Morris are direct descendants of Frederick Douglass, the man called “the father of the civil rights movement” and Booker T. Washington, the famed educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute. Through the union of Ms. Douglass’ mother, Nettie Hancock Washington (granddaughter of Booker T. Washington), and her father, Dr. Frederick Douglass III (great grandson of Frederick Douglass), the founders unite the bloodlines of two of the most important names in American history.

A few years back, the founders were confronted for the first time with solid facts about modern day slavery: millions are still enslaved in every country of the world, including the United States, in conditions as bad or worse than those suffered by their ancestors. They decided that this was not something from which they could walk away especially considering the platform granted to them by their lineage.

Based on their experience and the opinions of leading experts in the field, FDFI founders believe that education and awareness are the first step to ending Human Trafficking in our lifetimes. The organization has, therefore, made it their business to educate the public about this veiled crime with the starting point being young people.

“When we work with students,” says Ms. Douglass, “we can accomplish several things at once: provide an interesting narrative about an important period in our history that is often overlooked; inspire modern Abolitionists; provide timely information that may prevent young people themselves from becoming victims and help create better world citizens.”

FDFI brings the guidance of history to the fight against modern forms of slavery.

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Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI): "International Child Trafficking."

The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI) was co-founded in June 2007 by Nettie Washington Douglass, her son, Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. and Robert J. Benz. FDFI is an Abolitionist organization that combines lessons from the legacies of Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington: Abolition Through Education.

The founders represent a remarkable living history. Ms. Douglass and Mr. Morris are direct descendants of Frederick Douglass, the man called “the father of the civil rights movement” and Booker T. Washington, the famed educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute. Through the union of Ms. Douglass’ mother, Nettie Hancock Washington (granddaughter of Booker T. Washington), and her father, Dr. Frederick Douglass III (great grandson of Frederick Douglass), the founders unite the bloodlines of two of the most important names in American history.

A few years back, the founders were confronted for the first time with solid facts about modern day slavery: millions are still enslaved in every country of the world, including the United States, in conditions as bad or worse than those suffered by their ancestors. They decided that this was not something from which they could walk away especially considering the platform granted to them by their lineage.

Based on their experience and the opinions of leading experts in the field, FDFI founders believe that education and awareness are the first step to ending Human Trafficking in our lifetimes. The organization has, therefore, made it their business to educate the public about this veiled crime with the starting point being young people.

“When we work with students,” says Ms. Douglass, “we can accomplish several things at once: provide an interesting narrative about an important period in our history that is often overlooked; inspire modern Abolitionists; provide timely information that may prevent young people themselves from becoming victims and help create better world citizens.”

FDFI brings the guidance of history to the fight against modern forms of slavery.

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Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI): "Understanding Slavery Through Survivor Narratives."

The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI) was co-founded in June 2007 by Nettie Washington Douglass, her son, Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. and Robert J. Benz. FDFI is an Abolitionist organization that combines lessons from the legacies of Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington: Abolition Through Education.

The founders represent a remarkable living history. Ms. Douglass and Mr. Morris are direct descendants of Frederick Douglass, the man called “the father of the civil rights movement” and Booker T. Washington, the famed educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute. Through the union of Ms. Douglass’ mother, Nettie Hancock Washington (granddaughter of Booker T. Washington), and her father, Dr. Frederick Douglass III (great grandson of Frederick Douglass), the founders unite the bloodlines of two of the most important names in American history.

A few years back, the founders were confronted for the first time with solid facts about modern day slavery: millions are still enslaved in every country of the world, including the United States, in conditions as bad or worse than those suffered by their ancestors. They decided that this was not something from which they could walk away especially considering the platform granted to them by their lineage.

Based on their experience and the opinions of leading experts in the field, FDFI founders believe that education and awareness are the first step to ending Human Trafficking in our lifetimes. The organization has, therefore, made it their business to educate the public about this veiled crime with the starting point being young people.

“When we work with students,” says Ms. Douglass, “we can accomplish several things at once: provide an interesting narrative about an important period in our history that is often overlooked; inspire modern Abolitionists; provide timely information that may prevent young people themselves from becoming victims and help create better world citizens.”

FDFI brings the guidance of history to the fight against modern forms of slavery.

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Free the Slaves: "Activity Sheet"

Free the Slaves was born in the early days of the new millennium, dedicated to alerting the world about slavery’s global comeback and to catalyze a resurgence of the abolition movement.

Slavery has been outlawed everywhere, but it has not been eradicated. Free the Slaves exists to help finish the work that earlier generations of abolitionists started.

We help those in slavery escape the brutality of bondage. We help prevent others from becoming trapped by traffickers. We help officials bring slave holders to justice. We help survivors restore their dignity, rebuild their lives, and reclaim the future for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Slavery will end when businesses clean up their supply chains and consumers demand slavery-free products, when governments and international institutions toughen enforcement and fund anti-slavery work worldwide, and when activists and advocates educate the vulnerable about their rights and empower those in slavery to take a stand for freedom.

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Free the Slaves: "Case Studies and Discussion Questions."

Free the Slaves was born in the early days of the new millennium, dedicated to alerting the world about slavery’s global comeback and to catalyze a resurgence of the abolition movement.

Slavery has been outlawed everywhere, but it has not been eradicated. Free the Slaves exists to help finish the work that earlier generations of abolitionists started.

We help those in slavery escape the brutality of bondage. We help prevent others from becoming trapped by traffickers. We help officials bring slave holders to justice. We help survivors restore their dignity, rebuild their lives, and reclaim the future for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Slavery will end when businesses clean up their supply chains and consumers demand slavery-free products, when governments and international institutions toughen enforcement and fund anti-slavery work worldwide, and when activists and advocates educate the vulnerable about their rights and empower those in slavery to take a stand for freedom.

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Free the Slaves: "Resources"

Free the Slaves was born in the early days of the new millennium, dedicated to alerting the world about slavery’s global comeback and to catalyze a resurgence of the abolition movement.

Slavery has been outlawed everywhere, but it has not been eradicated. Free the Slaves exists to help finish the work that earlier generations of abolitionists started.

We help those in slavery escape the brutality of bondage. We help prevent others from becoming trapped by traffickers. We help officials bring slave holders to justice. We help survivors restore their dignity, rebuild their lives, and reclaim the future for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Slavery will end when businesses clean up their supply chains and consumers demand slavery-free products, when governments and international institutions toughen enforcement and fund anti-slavery work worldwide, and when activists and advocates educate the vulnerable about their rights and empower those in slavery to take a stand for freedom.